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Reviving a tradition that’s beneficial to more than just your back garden.

Beekeeping may not seem like a job for the feint-hearted, but it’s actually a lot less difficult and time consuming (and dangerous!) as you may have thought. What’s more, right now bees need our help, just as much as we need theirs.

Doug Purdie, a self-titled Beevangelist, is on a mission to support the honeybee population by dotting Sydney’s rooftops and backyards with hives.

Worldwide, the bee population is not looking good. Afflicted by a weakening parasite and colony collapse disorder, they are suffering major declines, which can have significant implications for our food production.

Bees pollinate around 90 per cent of our nutritious food, so without them we would be in big trouble, explains Doug. So his ultimate goal is to protect local bee populations from these threats. He also wants to raise awareness about the negative impact pesticides can have on bee populations and to get people thinking about their food choices.

Keeping bees is a tradition that has been practiced for a very long time, and is being revived by people of all ages. Beekeeping is fast becoming the new black, and that can only be a good thing for natural pollination and maintaining the diversity of our bees.

It is also surprisingly easy. It requires very little effort; just get the hive set up, introduce some bees, check and maintain it throughout the year, and the bees will do the rest! Although, doing some research and attending a course is highly recommended before you start your bee venture; you’ll want to know how to avoid those stings and ensure your hive is ticking over nicely.

Your reward will be delicious, fresh, raw honey and richly pollinated gardens and veggie patches for you and your neighbours.

But for Doug, the biggest pleasure in beekeeping is also the most simple. The most rewarding part is “just sitting by the hive and watching them come and go with pollen on their legs from all over the neighbourhood.” It’s easy to see how you could while away hours with your bees.

If you want to try your hand at being at an urban apiarist (beekeeper), check out Doug’s courses and mentoring programmes which run in Sydney.

There are also beekeeping clubs throughout the country in both urban and rural areas, so do a search of your local area.

Doug also keeps a handy blog and has written a beekeeping bible, Backyard Bees.

Reviving a tradition that’s beneficial to more than just your back garden.

Beekeeping may not seem like a job for the feint-hearted, but it’s actually a lot less difficult and time-consuming (and dangerous!) as you may have thought. What’s more, right now bees need our help, just as much as we need theirs.

Doug Purdie, a self-titled Beevangelist, is on a mission to support the honeybee population by dotting Sydney’s rooftops and backyards with hives.

Worldwide, the bee population is not looking good. Afflicted by a weakening parasite and colony collapse disorder, they are suffering major declines, which can have significant implications for our food production.

Bees pollinate around 90 per cent of our nutritious food, so without them, we would be in big trouble, explains Doug. So his ultimate goal is to protect local bee populations from these threats. He also wants to raise awareness about the negative impact pesticides can have on bee populations and to get people thinking about their food choices.

Keeping bees is a tradition that has been practised for a very long time, and is being revived by people of all ages. Beekeeping is fast becoming the new black, and that can only be a good thing for natural pollination and maintaining the diversity of our bees.

It is also surprisingly easy. It requires very little effort; just get the hive set up, introduce some bees, check and maintain it throughout the year, and the bees will do the rest! Although, doing some research and attending a course is highly recommended before you start your bee venture; you’ll want to know how to avoid those stings and ensure your hive is ticking over nicely.

Your reward will be delicious, fresh, raw honey and richly pollinated gardens and veggie patches for you and your neighbours.

But for Doug, the biggest pleasure in beekeeping is also the most simple. The most rewarding part is “just sitting by the hive and watching them come and go with pollen on their legs from all over the neighbourhood.” It’s easy to see how you could while away hours with your bees.

If you want to try your hand at being at an urban apiarist (beekeeper), check out Doug’s courses and mentoring programmes which run in Sydney.

There are also beekeeping clubs throughout the country in both urban and rural areas, so do a search of your local area.

Doug also keeps a handy blog and has written a beekeeping bible, Backyard Bees.

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